Feeds:
Posts
Comments

It’s been long time I know. Months have passed without a whisper from me. Even the Tweets have been minimal. It has not been down to a lack of intent, goodness no. Or a lack of ideas of what to say. Instead, every second of my free time during the summer has been spent frantically working or being with my family. Time passes and some things just don’t seem to get done. It’s catch up time now and in an attempt to get back up-to-date with it all I’ve decided to do a sort of summer highlights of what I’ve been up to.

So much has happened. My attempt at growing vegetables in my new plot [found via Landshare] has kept me busy. I still pinch myself at how lucky I am to have access to this growing patch, it has been a tranquil place of escape for a few moments each day during watering/picking visits.

It has proved to be very productive despite the wet summer [but we always have wet summers here in Bolton]. I have loved the challenge of making sure we use all the produce from the plot [especially the gluts] and have bought very little veg from the shops. And it is true; everything just tastes so much better. I’m now looking forward to making the most of the plot during autumn/winter and have already set in motion an attempt to grow some veg for our massive family Christmas feast. I have rows of sprouts! Not the usual smooth green ones but the red and the pretty flower varieties. If I can catch all the Cabbage White caterpillars, then there will be hope.

I have also grown Sweetpeas at the plot. They we’re my choice of flowers for my wedding bouquet many moons ago and have since become rather special. They have been so easy to grow and have filled the house all summer, even now I’m bringing back small bunches. Inspired by all this Sweetpea picking, I’m now on a mission digging up a mini field to create a proper cutting garden. Fingers crossed, it will be something to write about at a later date.

IronMan UK [ridiculously long distance triathlon that has to be completed in no more than one second over 17 hours...or you don't get the medal] has also been a major event for us this year. Not so much the actual IronMan D-day but the year and a half build-up of constant, full on training. I’ve now had a glimpse at what being a one parent family would be like; very, very hard work. The event itself was incredible [the mass swim awesome] and I rose to the challenge of chief cowbell ringer and ‘come on’ screamer. Yes, I was the dutiful IronWife spectator with IronKids and IronDog in tow. I loved it. It was one of those moments that puts your faith back into humanity, people’s strength of mind, body and spirit to get through the IronMan hell makes anything possible. Truly inspiring. My crazy IronMan husband crossed the finishing line in under 14 hours [he'll be cringing once he's found out he's been mentioned here]. Very proud of him and all done for UNICEF.

I’ve also been finding inspiration from simply going on walkies with the dog. Ever since getting Ollie, two year’s ago now, my eyes have been opened to the flora in the fields nearby. I can’t help myself, I have a frenzy of picture taking, attempting to capture the delicate weaving mass of wildflowers and grasses.

It’s that en-mass presence that makes me swoon; similar to, but much more subtle than, the jaw-dropping prairie planting style I also love. My excitement at flora spotting in my local area was then taken to new heights when I was commissioned to do a piece on the Olympic Parkland. I had no idea what to expect and was bowled over when I visited. It is a parkland like no other and what strikes you is the way how the designers have worked in harmony with the natural, historic landscape of the area.

Instead of coming up with a randomly plucked spatial design and imposing it on the landscape, the concept has stripped the very industrialised site back to its original wetlands, reed beds, wet and dry woodlands and perennial wildflower meadows. Not a rose garden in sight. These wilder areas are cleverly blended into tamer areas of expansive spectator lawns and promenades; inspired by the Victorian and post-war pleasure gardens.

Bioswales [image above] and rain gardens are some of the features that help this blending; doubling up as a functional, innovative solution to excess run-off water.

Even the Great British garden has a contemporary, nature-inspired spin on the traditional with much more relaxed planting schemes [image above]. If you want to read more about the Olympic Parkland design, the article is still live and can be viewed here.

In terms of my gardening business, I have to be honest, this year has been a struggle. I had a devastatingly quiet winter, a barely survivable trickle of jobs through spring and a summer that’s just been crackers. I’m happy to be flat out with work now, but it’s been frustrating and I need to find balance. Plan A was to go back to graphic design [freelance] during the winter.  A sensible option but one that disheartened me; it would not give me professional development in the landscape industry. Instead, serendipity intercepted in the form of a heads up on a part-time experienced gardener position at a private residence 13 minutes drive from where I live. Walled vegetable and cutting garden. Herbaceous borders and heathland beds. Meadows, grassy wildflower bunds [man-made mounds from on-site excavations that are planted up] and areas in need of conservation. Native woodland. Possibilities of introducing prairie style plantings.

I got the job and I’m over the moon. I can now concentrate on developing one garden rather then hurtling down the motorways to spend a couple of hours here and there. Just think of the amount of diesel I’ll save. It has also focused my attentions on my garden design business, how it can be developed to attract clients that desire more nature-inspired and innovative spaces. I’m actually looking forward to the winter months now, with a sense of security, I can plan for next year…and peruse the vegetable seed catalogues.

Moving away from work, there is one more thing I just have to quickly mention… my chickens! They are such a highlight to our busy lives. Every day they put a smile on my face with their odd habits, little quirks and beautiful eggs. They are simple little pleasures, no trouble to look after and have become the soul of our garden…so thank you chickens. [I just need to re-think that planting.]

Last month I was incredibly privileged to be invited to see how a primary school in Ipswich is embracing a kitchen garden project, supported by the Jamie Oliver Foundation. This school is not just dabbling in growing a few vegetables but is working hard to incorporate running and maintaining a real kitchen garden that provides their dedicated Classroom Kitchen with fresh produce to cook with…and all done by the children at the school. It is an inspiring project that engages children in ‘hands-on’ activities, from the obvious sowing and hoeing to expanding their knowledge about vegetables … to recognising when things are ripe for harvest and the oodles of benefits that eating fresh, home grown fruit and vegetables brings with it. All this is then followed through into the purpose-built Classroom Kitchen where the children learn how to prepare and cook their school-grown produce.

Having young children of my own who attend a lovely primary school, also trying to make growing food more integral to their teaching, makes this project very interesting to me. Squeezing in duties to create a successful kitchen garden in between teaching classes is no mean feat and I was intrigued to find out how this is achieved at the pilot school.

Linking activities involved in gardening and cooking to the curriculum seems to be key; and there is relevance on so many levels. Literacy for example: reading and following instructions on seed sowing; researching what fruit and vegetables to grow using reference books and the internet; writing plant labels. Numeracy: following instructions on planting depths and spacings in cms and inches; writing dates on labels; measuring out quantities in g/kg etc. Science: simple plant biology; the role of the bee and other insects and the importance of pollination…etc. Art and Design: sensory elements within the garden, textures, colours, patterns, creating outdoor artwork to enhance the garden/micro-climate eg murals, buntings, insect boxes…etc.

Geography: Local environment, communities, sustainable gardening, composting, compass points, fieldwork skills and recording information eg of when seeds sowed to when ready to harvest etc, charts. Even Personal, Social and Health Education…nutrition, vitamins, healthy eating, exercise…

It all makes perfect sense and gives a practical side to so many aspects of the school curriculum. It is this relevance that has inspired the Headmaster at the pilot school to dedicate one morning a week off timetable to spend on gardening, cooking and other activities. A teacher takes the role of Garden Specialist who is responsible for co-ordinating the vegetable growing and a dedicated Kitchen Specialist, supported by the Jamie Oliver Foundation, takes on the role of teaching the children to cook. Other schools in the area are also invited to visit and take part in the Classroom Kitchen sessions.

During my visit a group of eight children [aged 7] spent the morning preparing and cooking their own dinner…all being filmed for a resource video about the project by Fresh One. On the menu, home made salmon fishcakes, roasted carrots, roasted potatoes with rosemary and pumpkin muffins. It’s a long time since I was in a school cooking class… but I remember I was much older than 7, probably more like 14. It was wonderful to see such young children getting to grips with peeling and cutting, cracking eggs and weighing…and to see them all sit down, outside [the sun was shining] and tuck in to their own-made dinner! Perfect. They all tried their food [bar one who insisted he had to eat his packed lunch]…and a few did clear their plates.

Another group of children were working through the vegetable beds, weeding and creating drills to sow beetroot. The school doesn’t have expansive grounds by any means, in fact it is quite small but manages to make the most of every available space. There are lots of simple wooden raised beds, fitted in all around the school buildings. There is a polytunnel, compost area, tool shed, a sensory garden with willow tunnel, perennial borders, herbs, water rills, weather station and lots of colourful artwork…and they keep a few chickens too!

It is a remarkable project that is proving to be invaluable for the school’s learning experience. The project has already seen a positive impact on children’s self-esteem and has given them a greater sense of teamwork. These life skills have transferred to the classroom, increasing their motivation to learn and improving peer relationships making a much happier school environment. Jamie Oliver’s Kitchen Garden Project has a big vision: “To get food education back on the primary school curriculum and for every child in the UK to have access to a kitchen garden project by 2022″. They are keen to work with like-minded people and organisations to make their vision happen and to help change the future health and success of our children. You can find more information here on the Jamie Oliver Foundation Kitchen Garden Project website.

I’d just like to say a big thanks to Michelle for inviting me to visit, Kate for putting up with me in the Classroom Kitchen and to everyone else at the school who made me feel welcome. Keep up the inspiring work.

In the meantime, I have myself made more of an effort with my two children in the kitchen and at our newly acquired plot. We spent the weekend sowing garlic, early peas and beetroot followed by a mammoth cooking session…we had to do the salmon fishcakes with roasted veg but followed with home-grown rhubarb and custard cake. The kids loved it.

Yum :)

After attending another session on Grafting Techniques, not the ‘hard work’ graft, but the ‘joining of two pieces of wood to create a new tree’ graft, I have decided to write a blog about it. The process has always intrigued me and after my first attempts at grafting last year, when all four miraculously took, I developed the grafting bug. At first the process seems complicated, but it soon falls into place once you start practicing the cuts and understand the science a bit. So, in an attempt to hopefully demystify grafting I am going to take you through the steps.

There are different types of grafting techniques but here I am just going to cover the crudely named ‘whip and tongue’ technique as this seems to be the most popular for fruit tree grafts. To create a graft you need two pieces of plant tissue that are related, ideally in the same genus or at least family group; a rootstock [which determines the tree’s size] and a scion [which determines the fruit variety].

Scions are taken from trees in the dormant season around December up to February. Select one-year-old wood, ideally pencil-thick, and cut to around 10 to 15cm long with four to six buds visible. Put these in a plastic bag, roll up and sneak them into the bottom of your fridge for safe keeping. The grafting procedure is then carried out towards the end of February until the end of March, just as the sap starts to rise.

The rootstock is a little more complicated. It is important to select the right rootstock for the space you have available for the tree to grow…and there are many to choose from. Frank Matthews has a good guide to the different rootstocks; MM106 and M26 semi dwarfing rootstocks tend to be the most popular for apples in gardens. Rootstocks will need to be bought in and can be purchased online via Blackmoor or Ashridge Nurseries.

The science behind grafting is fascinating and for those of you who have done the RHS General memories of plant biology will come flooding back. It all comes down to the cambium tissue that lies just beneath the bark and its ability to actively divide and reproduce cells [also called meristematic]. When two separate [but related] pieces of plant tissue are joined together, it is the matching up of the cambiums on the scion and rootstock to “intimately contact” each other that will make the union successful; as the two separate cambiums will fuse together.

Locating the cambium is relatively easy as we know it is just under the surface of the bark. We just need to make sure that the cut on each piece of wood is similar in width and length. Ideally choose a rootstock that has the same size girth as the scion. However, you may have thin scions that are impossible to match up in girth size to a rootstock; this always seems to happen to me. As long as you make sure one side of the cambium [on the scion and rootstock] is matched up and in “intimate contact” the union process will still occur.

Tools. A good grafting knife that is clean and sharp is essential and a sharpening stone to keep it that way would be useful. You will also need secateurs, elastic rubber to bind the two stems together and some grafting tape [some people use heated wax] to wrap around the secured join to protect from infection and lock in moisture. See Blackmoor for supplies. Oh, and a first aid kit would be wise.

So for the cuts. Starting with the scion… the aim is to make a smooth diagonal cut from one side of the stem right through to the other. Practice this as much as you can until you are happy with the cut [see my practice cuts below]. The tutor of the grafting course at Reaseheath, Harry Delaney, advises keeping your elbows tight to your side to help keep control of your knife and cuts. Some prefer to make cuts away from the body but Harry teaches cutting towards…hence the tight elbows…and the first aid kit.

Once you are happy with your practice cuts on your scion you need to make sure that a bud is present on the back of the cut side as in my practice cut below [see top diagram too].


Next, make a small, straight notch in the wood [in image scion is on the left, rootstock on the right]. This will slot into another notch that you will make on the rootstock and will form the union [helping to keep the pieces together].



For the rootstock, cut just above a bud [diagonal cut sloping away from the bud] to leave you with about 15cm for the stem height; you are also aiming for a bud to be present at the back of the cut on this too. You cut the rootstock differently to the scion as you don’t need to cut from one side of the stem through to the other. You just need to take the surface off to reveal the cambium. It is also good practice to measure your cut length on the scion against the rootstock, to get a good match. You are aiming for a little gap or ‘church window’ at the top of the join [left image] as well as the bottom [right image].


Once you are happy with the cut, which should be as smooth and as straight as possible, check that the two pieces of wood fit together with no gaps between the two surfaces. Now line up the cambiums, whether matching to both sides or just one [as in above right image] making sure the notches [graft union] are ‘hooked’ together [see diagram at top] and fasten the elastic tightly around the join and tie. You now need to stretch and mould the grafting tape around the join or dab with melted wax.

That’s it. Label with the variety and rootstock and you are ready to plant up. By April, if the cambium union has worked you should see the buds starting to burst. Very exciting. I shall be holding my breath for my grafts; three Quice ‘Vranja’ on rootstock Quince C [below] and one Apple Norfolk Beefing on M26.

Around November [and into December] the gardening round always throws up the question, ‘Would you like me to leave the seedheads or cut them down’? I always ask as it’s a personal preference…and it is their garden…and I always hope that maybe one day they will actually surprise me and all say, ‘leave them’.

More often than not I am cutting them down [Achillea, Anenome, Echinacea, Iris, Phlox, Rudbeckia, Salvia etc etc] and squeezing them into green wheelie bins, ladybirds and all. Feeling slightly guilty, I wait for these creatures to climb to the top of the stems, pick them off and attempt to find them a new home in the now naked garden. It is true what they say; leaving dead stems will provide homes for insects [beneficial as well as the pests] to hibernate through the winter and is one horticultural ‘good practice’ reason not to do the chop.

Another reason to leave them is for their structural contribution to the winter garden. No one can deny how interesting dead stems can look after a hard frosty night, all icy and crystallized. I am a huge fan of this transformation and is my excuse for being ultimately lazy and not lifting a finger in my own garden till the spring.

However, not all plant specimens are good for this purpose. Many perennials and grasses disappointingly flop, strew themselves all over the ground and look a complete mangled hash. Molinia caerulea subsp. arundinacea ‘Transparent’ starts off by showing such wonderful promise. Tall, elegant, fawn-coloured stems gleam in the border, but then, overnight they flop. Drat. I have two of these grasses in the garden and so wish I’d gone for a sturdier Miscanthus instead.

With clients who don’t mind what I do with their stems, I always go with the ‘flop chop’ approach. All the sturdy stems I like stay and the flopped ones I don’t are cleared away. I’m happy, the bugs are happy, the client’s not really bothered.

The ‘leave or not to leave’ preference has even impacted on my planting design plans, particularly perennial and grass based schemes. All clients want low maintenance as well as year round colour and interest in their borders. Choosing plants that keep their structure well into winter is an important consideration and one that I have been making mental notes about over recent years.

Some favourites for keeping upright and strong stemmed are the umbels of Sedum and Achillea millefolium [‘Terracotta’ holds really well], the tiny spherical seedheads of Anenome, the spires of Digitalis and Verbascum, the whorls of Phlomis and the shorter billowy grasses Hakonechloa and Stipa tenuissima. Miscanthus, as mentioned already, is great for winter plume structure, Eupatorium maculatum for big perennial umbel structure and Ligularia japonica for fluffy seedheads that will be blown away in the winds. There are loads of suitable candidates out there, it’s just a matter of bearing in mind what happens to them after they have performed for the summer/autumn months…do they flop or not?

The main reasons for leaving them be in my own garden [above], are, in order of importance: first has to be ease of maintenance [laziness], second structure [I don’t usually do the ‘flop chop’ approach here either], third hibernating bugs, fourth I’d like to say annoy the neighbours, but they probably don’t give a monkeys about how my front garden looks and fifth because as soon as I sniff that lovely warming earthy smell of spring I can get out there and clear away the cobwebs till my hearts content.

So what kind of person are you, to leave or not to leave?

Here we are hurtling through November, the October blues are over and I have my fairy lights pinned around the outside of my greenhouse. Everything is sparkly again. You would think that as an Autumn baby I would be happy at this time of the year. Instead it’s all gloomy as summer has slipped away at break neck speed and it’s dark outside. Oh, and I always get some weird virus and the snot monster attacks. C’est la vie but at least I know I’m not alone.

So sparkly lights and pots full of winter bedding plants have cheered me up. I still have loads of apples, some are being stored, some are destined for the chickens [yes I have fruit-loving poots too] and some will be used to make even more of River Cottage’s irresistible Bramley Lemon Curd. Fruitshare has been bigger than ever this year, thanks to Twitter and the lovely people out there that have supported it. But there is a long way to go yet before it becomes a truly successful initiative.

The Newsround feature didn’t come off. The move to Salford and a change of heart with the producer meant that the cameras didn’t roll. I was disappointed. I felt awful that I had lined up a small team of willing children and fruit sharing mums to have to call it all off. The idea was to follow a fruit sharing journey, where apples would be collected from the garden of one family and given to another. Then, the fruit seeking family would get stuck in, aprons on, scales out, to transform the free apples into lovely puddings and jams.

Well, as it happened, it was decided that the fruit sharing journey would be recorded anyway! Not quite by a camera crew but by my trusty old camera instead. Kim Carmyllie [Mum, baker of fabulous cakes, Cub leader and IT Manager] was [and is] my Fruitshare star from sunny old Bolton who was still up for doing a fruit sharing rendezvous. I had recently discovered an untouched crop of the most delicious apples too and desperately needed someone to pass them on to!

The meeting took place over half term so I could get the kids to help out. Our first mission was to pick the apples. The tree is in the midst of a construction site for a self-build project [potential client] so the picking became more of an adventure. Mud and diggers everywhere. The son was in his element. After sliding down an embankment of excavated soil…we all fell silent; spell bound. No, not with more construction machinery, we had disturbed a young Roe deer who had been hiding in nearby undergrowth. We watched for a while before it bounded off across the fields. Magic. I have to point out that this plot of land is surrounded by busy roads just on the outskirts of Bury!

On with the apple picking, nettle stinging and embankment sliding we went and filled all our baskets. I am not sure what variety of apple it is but they are good eaters [and cookers as we later found out]. The tree has a beautiful shape and the branches fall all the way down to the ground; I have never seen one like it. The area used to be a small orchard and this is one of two trees that remain. I hope they decide to plant more.

With kids prepped to be on their best behaviour, off to Kim’s kitchen we went with our bounty. You can tell Kim enjoys her baking; a kitchen table full of baking goodies; home-made jams; chutneys; an apple jelly in the making; cupboards crammed with flours, sugars and spices. What would we make? This important decision was left to the kids…apple cake followed by apple and ginger jam. We all got stuck in; weighing, mixing, peeling, beating, pouring, sprinkling and the inevitable spoon licking!


I’m not sure on the exact recipe Kim used but I have located one that is similar here [we didn't add the toffee]. Once the cakes were poured into their cases the kids piled on an extra ingredient, demerara sugar, to give it a lovely sweet and crunchy crust. We popped them in the oven for around 40 minutes and boy those baking aromas were delicious!

Next, the apple and ginger jam. I have found a recipe, again similar to the one Kim used, on another blog here. Kim used stem ginger though and added in the syrup too. We chopped the apples and put them in a pan with the water and waited… and waited… and waited for them to turn into the pulpy texture we were expecting. The mystery apple seems to hold on to its texture when cooked…so a ‘chunky’ apple and ginger jam it was to be!

We were with Kim for a good few hours and enjoyed every minute; so a big thank you goes out to her :) We even got to take home some jars of jam and one of the apple cakes…both utterly delicious!

The harvest season is practically over, although I know there will still be thousands of trees out there hanging on to their fruits. The Fruitshare website will have some new features added for next year and I’m hoping for bigger and better publicity too. No doubt I will keep you all posted. Thank you again to all those that have supported this very new initiative x

You may have noticed my persistent Fruitshare.net plugging on Twitter has lapsed for a little while over the past week or so. Proper work [preparing borders for new planting] has been responsible for the mini break. But, despite the Twitter quietness, pretty incredible things have been developing for Fruitshare’s ‘spread the word’ campaign.

It began with an article about Fruitshare in my local newspaper the Bolton News, [thankfully the online version doesn't have the cheesy photo]. The article miraculously instigated two further publicity leads, a stint on BBC Radio Manchester with Heather Stott and, the cherry on top…an email from CBBC’s Newsround producer to say they’d like to feature Fruitshare! Obviously I said ‘yeah’!

I’m now in the process of gathering some ideas… potential gardens, Fruitsharers and Fruitseekers that would be up for a bit of stardom. I think I have sussed the first two…but just need someone from around Bolton or Manchester, preferably with kids [age 6 to 12], with a bit of a passion for baking [or jam making or whatever] to be our featured Fruitseeker. I shall thus be approaching those already registered on the Fruitshare website to see if I can find that special star…filming will take place over the next couple of weeks.

I’m very much excited about this little bit of national coverage for Fruitshare and keep my fingers crossed that it might just, maybe, possibly lead to a little bit more…I need to keep that publicity ball rolling. This week I will be around in the office a bit more so will continue the Fruitshare.net tweeting. If you happen to spot one, please do continue to retweet…it all really helps.

The number of registrations on the Fruitshare website keep rising, especially on the ‘Fruit Wanted’ list. My next mission is to try and up the numbers on the ‘Fruit Available’ list. Any Fruitseekers reading this, if you know of anyone living nearby that has a fruit tree growing in their garden please let them know about Fruitshare. This poster could be used in local shops or even posted through letterboxes to help spread the word in your area.

I will keep you all posted on how the Newsround feature develops and who will be the Fruitseeker star!

Thanks all and happy fruitsharing x

Some of you will have already clocked that I have a bit of thing for fruit. It was an unknown variety of strawberry that first made me swoon, an incredibly sweet and juicy one that simple knocks the socks off anyone who tastes them. That was the initial hook which consequently set about a heightened sense of awareness of what fruit, if any, was growing quietly in other people’s gardens …with a relentless desire to have a sneaky little taste.

My eagerness for wanting to find and try fruit was, all of a sudden, completely quenched with the onset of the apple harvest season. I gathered unwanted apples of all shapes and sizes from the gardens I worked on, made enough apple crumbles and apple Dorest cakes to feed the five thousand and had enough surplus apples to keep family and friends extremely happy. It was an overwhelming time and they weren’t even my apple trees.

Borne from this abundant apple frenzy is fruitshare.net. I wanted to find a way of sharing this unwanted garden grown fruit, not just in the area I live but to make it accessible to people across the country. The website was set up and then redeveloped a year later in partnership with another fruit enthusiast, Richard Borrie from orangepippin.com, into a fully working database driven website. We are now in the beginnings of our second harvest season and we are keen to spread the word about the Fruitshare initiative as the more people that know about it the more sharing of the country’s forgotten fruits will take place.

Hence, I am now on a little mission to get as much publicity as I possibly can, and by publicity I mean national… and beyond. I think the idea is a great one, but I am biased I know. What would be really really cool is if all of the grow your own/buy and source local/encourage sustainable food endorsing celebrities/organisations would give Fruitshare a big thumbs up and link up to us from their websites  …but, lets be honest, that would just be dreaming. So, back to reality, a press release is the normal first port of call. Done. This has been sent out to a whole raft of publications from local press [they're getting a bit fed up of me now I can tell], specialist magazines, national newspapers to BBC Breakfast! If anyone has close friends or relations at any of the major news publications please do get in touch!

You’re probably sensing that I’m not getting very far with the traditional publicising route; well you’d be pretty much spot on. Time is ticking, I don’t have oodles of free time to be chasing illusive ‘contacts’ I’ve been dragging out of the internet, I need a new plan.

Twitter. You’re very likely to be reading this because of Twitter. Fruitshare.net wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for Twitter [Richard from Orangepippin contacted me via Twitter]. My other half rolls his eyes every time I mention Twitter…like many other other halves I am sure. People love Twitter, people hate Twitter. Twitter has had bad press, has been blamed for the recent youth riots, but, it was also the cause for the mass community clean ups that followed. It has a good side and bad side; I want to bring out its great side.

With Twitter on my mind I have devised a new little plan, just to see how far I can publicise Fruitshare by just tweeting. As Fruitshare’s website is purely in existence today due to Twitter what better way to see the initiative evolve into an international phenomenon [there's no harm in thinking BIG!].

So here’s the plan. If you think the Fruitshare idea is a great one and would like to get involved by spreading the word just simply retweet my tweets about Fruitshare. My mission is to tweet appropriate publications/media/organisations details of and a link to the Fruitshare site plus a link to this blog in the hope that they will give coverage to the scheme.

That’s it. Not rocket science I know. It may be a complete belly flop from which I’ll need to pick myself up and put my thinking cap on again. But, I’m up for giving it a go as I really would like to see people making the most out of the nation’s forgotten garden fruits. Please help by spreading the word. Thank you x

 

UPDATE 12/09/11

It is day 6 of the Fruitshare campaign and so far the blog stats have rocketed, the retweets have been immense and the lists on the fruitshare.net site are getting longer! Support and feedback has been really positive and I thank everyone who has spread the word so far.

One other idea I’ve come up with to help promote the Fruitshare initiative is a little A4 poster that can be downloaded from here, printed out and pinned to notice boards up and down the country [and beyond] in offices, cafes and shops. I’m demanding I know. I am duly printing them off myself and will be loading up the other half with them [who's still rolling his eyes at me] to put up around his workplace. I shall go and hassle all the shop owners, with big smiles.

I am still persisting with the Twitter campaign, although I do sense most are now fully informed with the whole Fruitshare thing…I apologies for my one track mind and repetitiveness. It shall all be over with the end of the harvests! My mission is still to get some national media coverage [I'm afraid I'm still thinking BIG]; and would love anyone to contact me for the official Fruitshare press release [mentioned earlier], for a chat about the project or any other ideas on how to spread the Fruitshare word. As you’ve probably guessed, I’m a bit passionate about the whole affair and will even share my precious, maturing sloe gin with anyone who can steal me that national slot for Fruitshare!

Thank you everyone, happy Fruitsharing x

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,785 other followers